University Library Reopening: Updated FAQs

What work was conducted in the Library over the summer that required the building to be closed?

Sacramento State’s University Library was closed over the summer to conduct asbestos abatement and encapsulation on the first floor, lower level, and breezeway. This project also will allow the University to move forward with much-needed future improvements, such as upgrades to the fire alarm system, electricity, and lighting. The closure was purposely scheduled for the summer to minimize the inconvenience for students, faculty and staff.

Is the University Library Open?

All abatement work has been completed and the University Library is cleared for occupancy. Replacement ceiling tile work will continue on the lower level for the next one to two weeks, so that the library can be fully reopened for fall semester. The project has allowed the University to move forward with much-needed future improvements, such as upgrades to the fire alarm system, electricity, and lighting.

Please allow for construction noise this week as the ceiling grid is put into place. The first two floors of the Library will be louder than usual.

Is the building okay to reoccupy?

Yes. Air monitoring for asbestos was conducted throughout the project to assure that no asbestos fibers are migrating outside of the work area. Additional samples were collected prior to removal of the containment to demonstrate that the area is safe for occupancy. All samples were collected and analyzed by a third party asbestos consultant following the same state of the art procedures approved by the EPA for K-12 schools.

Is there still work being done on the lower level?

Yes. Replacement ceiling tile work will continue on the lower level daily for the next one to two weeks, so that the library can be fully reopened for fall semester. Please allow for construction noise this week as the ceiling grid is put into place. The first two floors of the Library will be louder than usual.

Is there still asbestos in the Library after the abatement project?

Yes. Some of the asbestos was removed, but some of it was encapsulated and remains on the property. Encapsulation covers the material with an adhesive to prevent the release of fibers. All of this work was performed to meet all legal and safety requirements.

Should I be concerned about exposure to asbestos?

Asbestos is present at very low concentrations in the environment, particularly in urban areas. All buildings constructed prior to 1978, including residential, public and commercial buildings, have asbestos in some of the construction materials. As long as the material is intact, it does not present a risk of exposure.

When maintenance or renovation requires the material to be disturbed, the University uses a licensed abatement contractor and third-party consultant to assure that the work is completed properly. The work done in the University Library follows Cal/OSHA and AHERA standards to prevent exposure to workers and students.

Who do I contact for more information?

If you have questions that are not answered on the University Library website, please visit: use the Library Suggestions Form.


University Library Closure: FAQ

Why is the University Library being temporarily closed?

Sacramento State’s University Library is temporarily closed this summer to conduct asbestos abatement on the first floor, lower level, and breezeway. The maintenance also will allow the University to move forward with much-needed future improvements, such as upgrades to the fire alarm system, electricity, and lighting. The closure was purposely scheduled in the summer when school is not in session to minimize the inconvenience for faculty and students.

What are the dates the library will actually be closed?

The library is scheduled to be closed from 5 p.m. May 20 to 7:30 a.m. Aug, 8, 2016. The goal is for the library to be open again in time for the fall semester.

What about students or faculty who wish to use the library during the maintenance work?

A limited number of services and personnel are still available. They include:

  • A faculty and student library service point, which is set up in the Special Collections and University Archives (SCUA) Reading Room, located by the south library ramp (just across from the Academic Information Resource Center, or AIRC).

    In addition, Sac State students and faculty may use computers and study space in the University Union and the AIRC. 7a.m. to 7p.m. Sunday-Friday.

  • Reference librarians and student employees will be at the SCUA service point Monday-Friday from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. to provide research assistance and access to summer Course Reserve materials. Library staff and students will be providing informational services in the AIRC Monday-Friday 4p.m. to 7p.m.

  • Expedited Inter-Library Loan (ILLiad) for research and teaching materials.

  • Enhanced online journal and e-book collections. The library has increased access to 34,000 e-books and upgraded our primary search database, Academic Search Complete, to provide access to an additional 3,750 academic journals and 15,000 business-related materials.

  • We also encourage use of our virtual research support, which is available 24/7: http://library.csus.edu/default2.asp%3FpageID=74.html

What services will not be available during the temporary closure?

There is no physical access to library collections or research computers. Because we are limited to providing core services, we encourage members of the general public to visit the Sacramento Public Library during the temporary closure. Sacramento Public Library locations can be found here: http://www.saclibrary.org/locations.

I have books that I’d like to return to the Library, what are my options?

All due dates have been extended, unless recalled by another user. Therefore you may hold on to your books until the Library re-opens. Should you want to drop your books off, there are four options:

  • Special Collections and University Archives has a Library service desk where books may be dropped off.

  • You may also drop off your books at our campus book drops:

    • One is located just southwest of Eureka Hall

    • One on the east side of Sequoia Hall

    • One to the south of Benicia Hall (on the Hornet Shuttle route)

See locations on campus map

Can I check out books this summer while the library is closed?

Yes, books can be checked out by using our Interlibrary Loan (ILLiad) service.

Can faculty/staff have interlibrary loan books delivered to their department office mail boxes

Yes, select mail to department office for preferred delivery method when creating an ILLiad account. If you already have an existing account please contact User Services staff at lib-userservices@csus.edu to indicate you would prefer books to be delivered to your department office mail box. Library Use Only items will still need to be used in the Library.

Will students have access to Course Reserve textbooks and materials?

Check OneSearch to determine if the book is available in the Sac State Library. If a hard copy has been placed on Reserve students can check it out from 9am-4pm in Special Collections and University Archives, top of the south ramp for the University Library (by AIRC). Normal checkout periods (e.g. 2 hour, 24 hours, 3 days, 7 days) for course reserve materials will be in force. Many titles used in courses this summer are available as eBooks in OneSearch.

Where can I go for research assistance?

There are many ways that you may receive assistance:

  • Call 916-278-5673 or send an email to lib-ref@saclink.csus.edu to make an appointment to meet with a librarian.

  • Chat 24/7 with a librarian or send us an email with your research question: Ask A Librarian

  • Visit us at our Service Desk set up in the Special Collections & University Archives

    • Monday-Friday 9a.m. to 4p.m.

  • Evenings we offer informational services, study space and computer access in the AIRC

    • Monday-Friday 4p.m. to 7p.m. (with staff and student support)

Where can I study if the University Library is closed?

  • You may study in the AIRC and the Student Union on campus

  • Public libraries in the region have a variety of locations and hours:

Can I still check out a laptop?

Sac State students can check out Dell laptops, MacBook Airs, Surface Pros, and iPads for 4 hours between the hours of 7a.m to 7p.m. , Monday – Friday in AIRC Room 2004.

I need access to library stacks and a research collection. May I go to UC Davis?

Yes. The Sacramento State University Library has an ongoing agreement that allows our campus faculty to use the UC Davis Libraries and to check out materials. This summer our sister campus has partnered with us to generously expedite services:

  • Active faculty members may visit the UC Davis campus and receive privileges by presenting their current Sacramento State ID at the Shields Library Circulation Desk.

  • UC Davis has increased the number of books SacState faculty may check out at one time.

  • For the project timeline, UC Davis has generously waived ILL fees for requests from the CSUS University Library.

  • Faculty may sign on to the Guest Wi-Fi network, or preferably, the Eduroam network.

  • Faculty may purchase a UC Davis visitor parking pass.

  • Faculty’s $9 UC Davis parking fee will be reimbursed by the Sacramento State University Library.

    • Pick up a “petty cash” form from the Special Collections & University Archives service desk.

    • Take this form and your receipt to Cashier’s Office, Lassen Hall where you will receive a refund.

As a faculty member, I need access to materials in my subject area, what can I do?

Library electronic resources will be working 24/7 while the building is closed. Print materials can be requested through Interlibrary Loan, items will be available for pickup from Special Collections and University Archives on the south side of the library. Visit UC Davis Shields Library in person. Sac State faculty may present their valid Sac State OneCard to check out material. Book limits will be waived during this period.

I need to use micro-forms for my research, is this possible?

Yes, there is a micro scanner/printer set up in Special Collections and University Archives, top of the south ramp for the University Library (by AIRC). You can request microformat materials through InterLibrary Loan (Illiad).

Where will faculty and staff who are displaced by the closure be relocated?

Displaced staff and faculty have been temporarily moved out of the library and relocated to Sequoia Hall, Folsom Hall, and Napa Hall. Among the programs and centers that have been moved temporarily are: International Programs and Global Engagement, the Multi-Cultural Center, First Year Experience, the Center for College & Career Readiness, the Center for Teaching & Learning, the Community Engagement Center, and the University Library Art Gallery.

Why weren’t we told sooner that the library would be closing?

Available funding for the end of the budget year fast-tracked this project. We realize this causes some short-term challenges for our summer students and researchers, but conducting this maintenance during summer session will have the lowest impact on the campus community as a whole.

How will the work be completed?

The campus has contracted with a licensed abatement specialist to complete the work. Additionally, an outside third-party expert will oversee the project to make sure the abatement is appropriately completed. The work will be contained in a manner that will prevent any exposure to the campus community. Regular air tests will be completed throughout the abatement process to ensure that no fibers become airborne.

What improvement work, other than asbestos abatement, will be accomplished this summer?

The asbestos abatement will set the stage for future projects.

  • The Library will be replacing some worn carpeting and replacing ceiling tiles.

  • If there is time, seating will be ordered and set up in the breezeway

  • The electrical, alarm, and camera improvements will happen in the future, once funds have been secured.

I’ve heard asbestos can be harmful to your health. What are the risk factors?

Asbestos was commonly used in building construction until the late 1970s for its insulation, sound reduction, and fire retardant qualities. If left undisturbed, asbestos is not considered hazardous. A risk of exposure occurs only if the asbestos becomes airborne and inhaled. Asbestos fibers are composed of microscopic crystals considered carcinogenic. For more information about asbestos, visit the Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) website here: EPA FAQs.

Have Questions?

If you have any questions please use the Library Suggestions Form.

Last Updated: 8/23/2016