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An image map of California showing roughly defined tribal boundaries. These boundaries are linked within the image. A list of tribes north to south, and a list of tribes alphabetically are available as well for navigation

"California: Key to Tribal Territories, p. ix" taken from the Handbook of North American Indians, 8, California. Edited by Robert F. Heizer. Washington: Smithsonian Institution, 1978. Used with permission from the Smithsonian Institution and the Handbook of North American Indians.



Selected General Sources On California Native Americans

Bean, L. J., & Blackburn, T. C. (Eds.). (1976). Native Californians: A theoretical retrospective. Ramona, CA: Ballena Press. E78 .C15 N37 - 2 South

Eargle, D. H. Jr. (1991). The Earth is our mother: A guide to the Indians of California, their locales and historic sites. San Francisco: Trees Company Press. E78 .C15 E2 1991 - 2 South

Davis, J. T. (1974). Trade routes and economic exchange among the Indians of California, Ballena Press Publications in Archaeology, Ethnology and History, 3. Ramona, CA: Ballena Press. E78 .C15 D3 1974 - 2 South

Garner, V. H. (1982). The broken ring: The destruction of the California Indians. Tuscon, AZ: Westernlore Press. E78 .C15 G27 - 2 South

Greenwood Press. (1973). Indians of California, Keepsake Series (Book Club of California). (12 Vols.). San Francisco: Book Club of California. E78 .C15 I35 no. 1-12 - Special Collections & University Archives - Library Use Only

Harwood, G. H. (1997). Indians and Indian agents: The origins of the reservation system in California, 1849-1852. Norman: University of Oklahoma Press. E78 .C15 P46 1997 - 2 South

Heizer, R. F. (1966). Languages, territories, and names of California Indian tribes. Berkeley: University of California Press. E78 .C15 H43 - 2 North Reference - Library Use Only

Heizer, R. F. (1974). Indians of California: A collection of maps on tribal distributions, California Indians 2, American Indian Ethnohistory: California and Basin-Plateau Indians. E78 .C15 C29 v. 2 - 2 South

Heizer, R. F. (Ed.). (1976). A collection of ethnographical articles on the California Indians, Ballena Press Publications in Archaeology, Ethnology, and History, 7. Ramona, CA: Ballena Press. E78 .C15 C682 - 2 South

Heizer, R. F., & Elsasser, A. B. (1980). The natural world of the California Indians, California Natural History Guides, 46. Berkeley: University of California Press. E78 .C15 H433 - 2 South

Klimek, S. (1935). The structure of California Indian culture, University of California Publications in American Archaeology and Ethnology, 37(1). Berkeley: University of California Press. E78 .C15 K55 - 2 South

Kroeber, A. L. (1994). Types of Indian culture in California, University of California publications in American Archaeology and Ethnology, 2(3), 81-103. Berkeley: University of California Press. E51 .C152 - 2 South

Kroeber, A. L. (1925). Handbook of the Indians of California, Smithsonian Institution Bureau of Ethnology Bulletin, 78. Washington, D.C.: Government Printing Office. E78 .C15 K76 - 2 North Reference - Library Use Only

Powers, S. (1877). Tribes of California, Contributions to North American Ethnology, 3. Washington, D.C.: Government Printing Office. E71 .C76 v.3 - 2 North Quarto

Ramsaur, E. M. (1975). A historical narrative of the land claims of the Federated Indians of California. Unpublished master's thesis, California State University, Sacramento, Sacramento, California. Thesis R1785 1975 - Lower Level Thesis

Rawls, J. J. (1984). Indians of California: The changing image. Norman: University of Oklahoma Press. E87 .C15 R35 1984 - 2 South

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Tribes Alphabetically

Achumawi

Atsugewi

Cahto

Cahuilla

Chilula

Chimariko

Chumash

Coast Miwok

Coast Yuki

Costanoan

Cupeño


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Eastern Coastal Chumash

Eastern Miwok

Eastern Pomo

Esselen

Foothill Yokuts

Gabrieliño

Huchnom

Hupa

Ipai

Interior Chumash

Island Chumash


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Karok

Kitanemuk

Konkow

Lake Miwok

Lassik

Luiseño

Maidu

Mattole

Miwok

Monache

Nisenan


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Nomlaki

Nongatl

Northeastern Pomo

Northern Valley Yokuts

Obispeño and Purisimeño Chumash

Patwin

Pomo

Salinan

Serrano

Shasta

Sinkyone


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Southeastern Pomo

Southern Valley Yokuts

Tataviam

Tipai

Tolowa

Tübatulabal

Wailaki

Wappo

Western Pomo

Whilkut

Wintu

Wiyot

Yana

Yuki

Yurok


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Tribes North to South

Tolowa

Bright, J. O. (1964). Phonology of Smith River Athapaskan (Tolowa). International Journal of American Linguistics, 30(2), 101-107. http://www.jstor.org/stable/1263477 (Online access available to Sacramento State students, faculty, staff only)

Drucker, P. (1937). The Tolowa and their Southwest Oregon kin, University of California Publications in American Archaeology and Ethnology, 36(4), 221-299. Berkeley: University of California Press. E99 .T7 D8 - 2 South

Du Bois, C. A. (1932). Tolowa notes. American Anthropologist, 34(2), 248-262. http://www.jstor.org/stable/661654 (Online access available to Sacramento State students, faculty, staff only)

Gould, R. A. (1966). Archaeology of the Point St. George site and Tolowa prehistory, University of California Publications in Anthropology, 4. Berkeley, University of California Press. E99 .T7 G5 - 2 South

Gould, R. A. (1978). Tolowa. In R. F. Heizer (Ed.), Handbook of North American Indians Volume 8 California, (pp.128-136). Washington: Smithsonian Institution. E76.2 .H36 v.8 - 2 North Reference - Library Use Only

Slagle, A. L. (1985). Tolowa Indian shakers and the role of prophecy at Smith River, California. American Indian Quarterly, 9(3), 353-374. http://www.jstor.org/stable/1183835 (Online access available to Sacramento State students, faculty, staff only)

Thornton, R. (1984). Social organization and the demographic survival of the Tolowa. Ethnohistory, 31(3), 187-196. http://www.jstor.org/stable/482620 (Online access available to Sacramento State students, faculty, staff only)

Waterman, T. T. (Oct. - Dec., 1925). The village sites in Tolowa and neighboring areas in Northwestern California. American Anthropologist, New Series, 27(4), 528-543. http://www.jstor.org/stable/661075 (Online access available to Sacramento State students, faculty, staff only)

 

Karok

Bell, M. (1991). Karuk: The upriver people. Happy Camp, CA: Naturegraph Publishers. E 99 .K25 B45 1991 - 2 South

Bright, W. (1952). Linguistic innovations in Karok. International Journal of American Linguistics, 18(2), 53-62. http://www.jstor.org/stable/1263290 (Online access available to Sacramento State students, faculty, staff only)

Bright, W. (1957). The Karok language. University of California publications in linguistics 13. Berkeley: University of California Press. P 25 .C25 v.13 - 2 South

Bright, W. (1978). Karok. In R. F. Heizer (Ed.), Handbook of North American Indians Volume 8 California, (pp.180-189). Washington: Smithsonian Institution. E76.2 .H36 v.8 - 2 North Reference - Library Use Only

Chartkoff, J. L., & Chartkoff, K. K. (1975). Late period settlement of the middle Klamath River of Northwest California. American Antiquity, 40(2), 172-179. http://www.jstor.org/stable/279612 (Online access available to Sacramento State students, faculty, staff only)

Harrington, J. P.  (1932). Karuk Indian myths. Bureau of American Ethnology Bulletin 107. Washington: U.S. Govt. Print. Off. E 51 .U6 no.107 - 2 South

Harrington, J. P. (1932). Tobacco among the Karuk Indians of California, Smithsonian Institution. Bureau of American Ethnology Bulletin 94. Washington: U.S. Govt. Print. Off. E 51 .U6 no. 94 - 2 South

Kroeber, A. L., & E. Gifford, E. W. (1980). Karok myths. G. Buzaljko (Ed.). Berkeley: University of California Press. E 99 .K25 K76 1980 - 2 South

Pilling, A. R. (1989). Yurok aristocracy and "great houses". American Indian Quarterly, 13(4), 421-436. http://www.jstor.org/stable/1184525 (Online access available to Sacramento State students, faculty, staff only)

return to Key to Tribal Territories

 

Shasta

Curtis, E. S. (1907-1930). The Shasta. In F. W. Hodge (Ed.). The North American Indian: Being a series of volumes picturing and describing the Indians of the United States and Alaska, Volume 13, (pp. 105-126). New York: Johnson Reprint Corp. 1970. E 77 .C97 1970 v.13 - 2 North Reference - Library Use Only

Dixon, R.. B. (1907). The Shasta. Bulletin of the American Museum of Natural History, 17(5). 381-498. New York. E 99 .S33 D5 - 2 South

Holsinger, R. (1982). Shasta Indian tales. Happy Camp, CA: Naturegraph Publishers. E 99 .S332 H64 1982 - 2 South

Holt, C. (1946). Shasta ethnography. University of California Anthropological Records, 3(4), 299-349. Berkeley: University of California Press. E 99 .S33 H66 - 2 South

Merriam, C. H. (1926). The classification and distribution of the Pit River Indian tribes of California, Smithsonian Miscellaneous Collections, 78(3). Washington, Smithsonian Institution. E 99 .S332 M3 - 2 South

Merriam, C. H. (1967). Shaste notes. In R. F. Heizer (Ed.). Reports of the University of California Archaeological Survey, 68(2), (pp.213-218). Berkeley, University of California Press. E 78 .C15 C3 no. 68 pt. II - 2 South

Silver, S. (1978). Shastan Peoples. In R. F. Heizer (Ed.), Handbook of North American Indians Volume 8 California, (pp.211-224). Washington: Smithsonian Institution. E76.2 .H36 v.8 - 2 North Reference - Library Use Only

Wheeler-Voegelin, E. (1942). Northeast California. Anthropological Records, 7(2), 47-251. Berkeley and Los Angeles: University of California Press.
E 78 .C15 V63 - Special Collections & University Archives - Library Use Only

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Achumawi

Angulo, J.D., & L. S. Freeland. (1930). The Achumawi Language. International Journal of American Linguistics, 6(2). 77-120, http://www.jstor.org/stable/1263305 (Online access available to Sacramento State students, faculty, staff only)

Kniffen, F. B. (1928). Achomawi geography, University of California Publications in American Archaeology and Ethnology, 23(5). 297-332. Berkeley: University of California Press. E 99 .A15 K69 - 2 South

Merriam, C. H. (1926). The classification and distribution of the Pit River Indian tribes of California, Smithsonian Miscellaneous Collections, 78(3). Washington, Smithsonian Institution. E 99 .S332 M3 - 2 South

Olmstead, D. L., & Stewart, O. C. (1978). Achumawi. In R. F. Heizer (Ed.), Handbook of North American Indians Volume 8 California, (pp.225-235). Washington: Smithsonian Institution. E 77 .C97 1970 v.13 - 2 North Reference - Library Use Only

Uldall, H. J. (1935). A Sketch of Achumawi Phonetics. International Journal of American Linguistics, 8(1),73-77. http://www.jstor.org/stable/1263259 (Online access available to Sacramento State students, faculty, staff only)

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Yurok

Buckley, T. C. (1982). Menstruation and the power of Yurok women: Methods in cultural reconstruction. American Ethnologist, 9(1), 47-60. http://www.jstor.org/stable/644311 (Online access available to Sacramento State students, faculty, staff only)

Buckley, T. C. (2002). Standing ground: Yurok Indian spirituality, 1850-1990. Berkeley: University of California Press. E 99 .Y97 B83 2002 - 2 South

Erikson, E. H. (1943). Observations on the Yurok: childhood and world image, University of California Publications in American Archaeology and Ethnology, 35(10). 257-301. Berkeley, Los Angeles, University of California Press. E 99 .Y97 E7 - 2 South

Keeling, R. (1992). Music and culture history among the Yurok and neighboring tribes of Northwestern California. Journal of Anthropological Research, 48(1), 25-48. http://www.jstor.org/stable/3630607 (Online access available to Sacramento State students, faculty, staff only)

Kroeber, A. L. (1976). Yurok myths. Berkeley: University of California Press. E 99 .Y97 K76 - 2 South

O'Neale, L. M. (1995). Yurok-Karok basket weavers. Berkeley: Phoebe Apperson Hearst Museum of Anthropology. E 99 .Y97 O54 1995 - 2 South

Pilling, A. R. (1978). Yurok, In R. F. Heizer (Ed.), Handbook of North American Indians Volume 8 California, (pp.137-154). Washington: Smithsonian Institution. E 77 .C97 1970 v.13 - 2 North Reference - Library Use Only

Pilling, A. R. (1989). Yurok Aristocracy and "Great Houses". American Indian Quarterly, 13(4), 421-436. http://www.jstor.org/stable/1184525 (Online access available to Sacramento State students, faculty, staff only)

Robins, R. H. (1958). The Yurok language: grammar, texts, lexicon, University of California Publications in Linguistics, 15. Berkeley: University of California Press. P 25 .C25 v.15 - 3 North

Rojas, M. V. (2003). She bathes in a sacred place: Rites of reciprocity, power, and prestige in Alta California. Wicazo Sa Review, 18(1), 129-156. http://www.jstor.org/stable/1409435 (Online access available to Sacramento State students, faculty, staff only)

Sapir, J. (1928). Yurok Tales. The Journal of American Folklore, 41(160), 253-261. http://www.jstor.org/stable/534898 (Online access available to Sacramento State students, faculty, staff only)

Spott, R., and Kroeber, A. L. (1942). Yurok narratives, University of California Publications in American Archaeology and Ethnology, 35(9), 143-256. Berkeley and Los Angeles, University of California Press. E 99 .Y97 S6 - 2 South

Waterman, T. T. (1920). Yurok geography, University of California Publications in American Archaeology and Ethnology, 16(5), 177-314. Berkeley, University of California Press. E 99 .Y97 W3-2 South

Waterman, T. T. (1934). Yurok marriages, University of California Publications in American Archaeology and Ethnology, 35(1). Berkeley: University of California Press. E 99 .Y97 W34 - 2 South 

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Wiyot

Archaeological Research Facility, University of California. (1973). Two nineteenth century ethnographic documents on the Wiyot and Yurok Northwestern California and the Comanches of New Mexico and Texas. Berkeley: University of California Press. E 99 .W8 T9 - 2 South 

Elsasser, A. B. (1978). Wiyot, In R. F. Heizer (Ed.), Handbook of North American Indians Volume 8 California, (pp.155-163). Washington: Smithsonian Institution. E76.2 .H36 v.8 - 2 North Reference - Library Use Only

Loud, L. L. (1918). Ethnogeography and archaeology of the Wiyot territory, University of California Publications in American Archaeology and Ethnology, 14(3). 221-436. Berkeley: University of California press. E99 .W8 L8 - 2 South

Reichard, G. A. (1925). Wiyot grammar and texts, University of California Publications in American Archaeology and Ethnology, 22(1). Berkeley: University of California Press. PM 2605 .R4 - 3 North

Sapir, E. (1913). Wiyot and Yurok, Algonkin Languages of California. American Anthropologist, New Series, 15(4), 617-646. http://www.jstor.org/stable/659722 (Online access available to Sacramento State students, faculty, staff only)

Teeter, K. V. (1959). Consonant Harmony in Wiyot (With a Note on Cree). International Journal of American Linguistics, 25(1), 41-43. http://www.jstor.org/stable/1263922 (Online access available to Sacramento State students, faculty, staff only)

Teeter, K. V. (1964). The Wiyot language, University of California Publications in Linguistics, 37. Berkeley: University of California Press. P 25 .C25 v.37 - 3 North

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Hupa, Chilula, Whilkut

Bushnell, J. H. (1968). From American Indian to Indian American: The changing identity of the Hupa. American Anthropologist, New Series, 70(6), 1108-1116. http://www.jstor.org/stable/669512 (Online access available to Sacramento State students, faculty, staff only)

Goddard, P. E. (1903). Life and culture of the Hupa, University of California Publications in American Archaeology and Ethnology, 1(1). Berkeley: University of California Press. E 99 .H8 G6 - 2 South

Goddard, P. E. (1904). Hupa texts, University of California Publications in American Archaeology and Ethnology, 1(2), 89-368. Berkeley: University of California Press. PM 1362 .G7 - 3 North

Goddard, P. E. (1905). The morphology of the Hupa language, University of California Publications in American Archaeology and Ethnology, 3. Berkeley: University of California Press. PM 1362 .G7 - 3 North

Goddard, P. E. (1914). Chilula texts, University of California Publications in American Archaeology and Ethnology, 10(7). 289-379. Berkeley: University of California Press. PM 805 .Z73 1914 - 3 North

Goddard, P. E. (1914). Notes on the Chilula Indians of Northwestern California, University of California Publications in American Archaeology and Ethnology, 10(7). 265-288. Berkeley: University of California Press. E 99 .C553 G5 - 2 South

Goldschmidt, W. R. (1940). A Hupa "calendar". American Anthropologist, New Series, 42(1), 176-177. http://www.jstor.org/stable/663364 (Online access available to Sacramento State students, faculty, staff only)

Goldschmidt, W. R. (1940). The Hupa white deerskin dance, University of California Publications in American Archaeology and Ethnology, 35(8), 103-141. Berkeley: University of California Press. E98 .D2 G6 - 2 South

Lake, R. G. (1982). Chilula: People from the ancient redwoods. Washington, D.C.: University Press of America. E99 .C553 L34 1982 - 2 South

Lewis, D. R. (1994). Neither wolf nor dog: American Indians, environment, and agrarian change. New York: Oxford University Press. E 78 .W5 L48 1994 - 2 South

Morrow, J. A. (1975). The Hupa: An overlook. Unpublished master's thesis, California State University, Sacramento, Sacramento, California. Thesis M8829 1975 - Lower Level Theses

Norton, J. (1979). Genocide in Northern California. San Francisco: Indian Historian Press. E 78 .C15 N67 - 2 South

Wallace, W. J. (1948). Hupa narrative tales. The Journal of American Folklore, 61(242), 345-355. http://www.jstor.org/stable/536067 (Online access available to Sacramento State students, faculty, staff only)

Wallace, W. J. (1953). The role of humor in the Hupa Indian tribe. The Journal of American Folklore, 66(260), 135-141. http://www.jstor.org/stable/537327 (Online access available to Sacramento State students, faculty, staff only)

Wallace, W. J. (1977). Hupa Indians of Northwestern California, In Spencer, R. F., Jennings, J. D., et al. (Eds.), The Native Americans: Ethnology and backgrounds of the North American Indians (2nd ed). (pp. 204-217). New York: Harper & Row, Publishers. E77 .S747 1977 - 2 South

Wallace, W. J. (1978). Hupa, Chilula, and Whilkut, In R. F. Heizer (Ed.), Handbook of North American Indians Volume 8 California, (pp.164-179). Washington: Smithsonian Institution. E76.2 .H36 v.8 - 2 North Reference - Library Use Only

Wallace, W. J., & Taylor, E. S. (1950). Hupa sorcery. Southwestern Journal of Anthropology, 6(2), 188-196. http://www.jstor.org/stable/3628642 (Online access available to Sacramento State students, faculty, staff only)

Woodruff, C. E. (1892). Dances of the Hupa Indians. American Anthropologist, 5(1), 53-62 http://www.jstor.org/stable/658770 (Online access available to Sacramento State students, faculty, staff only)

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Chimariko

Bauman, J. (1980). Chimariko placenames and the boundaries of Chimariko territory, In K. Klar., M. Langdon., & S. Silver. (Eds.), American Indians and Indoeuropean studies: Papers in honor of Madison S. Beeler, (pp. 11-29). The Hauge: Mouton. P25 .S424 v.16 - 3 North

Dixon, R. B. (1910). The Chimariko Indians and language, University of California. Publications in American Archaeology and Ethnology, 5(5). Berkeley: University of California Press. 293-380. E99 .C56 D6 - 2 South

Harrington, J. C., & Merriam, C. H. (1967). Chimariko notes. In R. F. Heizer (Ed.), Reports of the University of California Archaeological Survey, 68 Part 2. (pp.226-229). Berkeley: University of California Press. E 78 .C15 C3 no. 68 pt. II - 2 South

Silver, S. (1978). Chimariko, In R. F. Heizer (Ed.), Handbook of North American Indians Volume 8 California, (pp.205-210). Washington: Smithsonian Institution. E76.2 .H36 v.8 - 2 North Reference - Library Use Only

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Wintu

Barrett, S. A. (1919). The Wintun Hesi ceremony, University of California. Publications in American Archaeology and Ethnology, 14(4). 437-488. Berkeley: University of California Press. E99 .W79 B2 - 2 South

Chase-Dunn, C. K. (1998). The Wintu and their neighbors: A very small world-system in Northern California. Tucson: University of Arizona Press.
E 99 .W78 C53 1998 - 2 South

Demetracopoulou, D., & Du Bois, C. (1932). A study of Wintu mythology. The Journal of American Folklore, 45(178), 373-500. http://www.jstor.org/stable/535747 (Online access available to Sacramento State students, faculty, staff only)

Du Bois, C. (1935). Wintu ethnography, University of California. Publications in American Archaeology and Ethnology, 36(1). Berkeley: University of California Press. E 99 .W79 D8 c.2 - 2 South

Heizer, R. F. (Ed.). (1973). Notes on the McCloud River Wintu, and selected excerpts from Alexander S. Taylor's Indianology of California. Berkeley: Archaeological Research Facility, Dept. of Anthropology, University of California. E 78 .C15 H45 - 2 South

La Pena, F. R. (1978). Wintu, In R. F. Heizer (Ed.), Handbook of North American Indians Volume 8 California, (pp.324-340). Washington: Smithsonian Institution. E76.2 .H36 v.8 - 2 North Reference - Library Use Only

La Pena, F. R. (1978). Wintu ethnography revised. Unpublished master's thesis, California State University, Sacramento, Sacramento, California. Thesis L3113 1978 - Lower Level Theses

McKibben, G., & Shepherd, A. (1997). In my own words: Stories, songs, and memories of Grace McKibben, Wintu. Berkeley: Heyday Books. E 99 .W78 M35 1997 - 2 South

Shepherd, A. (1989). Wintu texts, University of California Publications in Linguistics, 117. Berkeley: University of California Press. P 25 .C25 v. 117 - 3 North

Williams, S. A. (1989). The effect of the non-Indian presence on the environment, resources, settlement patterns, and material culture of selected groups of the Wintu. Unpublished master's thesis, California State University, Sacramento, Sacramento, California. Thesis W72713 1989 – Lower Level Theses

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Atsugewi

Dixon, R. B. (1908). Achomawi and Atsugewi tales. The Journal of American Folklore, 21(81), 159-177. http://www.jstor.org/stable/1263499 (Online access available to Sacramento State students, faculty, staff only)

Dixon, R. B. (1908). Notes on the Achomawi and Atsugewi Indians of Northern California. American Anthropologist, New Series, 10(2), 208-220. http://www.jstor.org/stable/659571 (Online access available to Sacramento State students, faculty, staff only)

Garth, T. R. (1944). Kinship terminology, marriage practice, and behavior toward kin among the Atsugewi. American Anthropologist, New Series, 46(3), 348-361. http://www.jstor.org/stable/663432 (Online access available to Sacramento State students, faculty, staff only)

Garth, T. R. (1945). Emphasis on industriousness among the Atsugewi. American Anthropologist, New Series, 47(4), 554-566. http://www.jstor.org/stable/663375 (Online access available to Sacramento State students, faculty, staff only)

Garth, T. R. (1953). Atsugewi ethnography, Anthropological Records, 14(2), 129-212. Berkeley: University of California Press. E 99 .A875 G37 - 2 North Quarto

Garth, T. R. (1978). Atsugewi, In R. F. Heizer (Ed.), Handbook of North American Indians Volume 8 California, (pp.237-243). Washington: Smithsonian Institution. E76.2 .H36 v.8 - 2 North Reference - Library Use Only

Olmstead, D. L. (1958). Atsugewi phonology. International Journal of American Linguistics, 24(3), 215-220. http://www.jstor.org/stable/1263499 (Online access available to Sacramento State students, faculty, staff only)

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Mattole, Nongatl, Sinkyone, Lassik, and Wailaki

Elsasser, A. B. (1978). Mattole, Nongatl, Sinkyone, Lassik, and Wailaki, In R. F. Heizer (Ed.), Handbook of North American Indians Volume 8 California, (pp.190-204). Washington: Smithsonian Institution. E76.2 .H36 v.8 - 2 North Reference - Library Use Only

Goddard, P. E. (1906). Lassik tales. The Journal of American Folklore, 19(73), 133-140. http://www.jstor.org/stable/534608 (Online access available to Sacramento State students, faculty, staff only)

Goddard, P. E. (1923). Wailaki texts. International Journal of American Linguistics, 2(3/4), 77-135. http://www.jstor.org/stable/1263274 (Online access available to Sacramento State students, faculty, staff only)

Goddard, P. E. (1924). Habitat of the Pitch Indians, a Wailaki division, University of California Publications in American Archaeology and Ethnology, 17(4), 217-225. Berkeley: University of California Press. E99 .W15 G7 - 2 South

Kroeber, A. L. (1919). Sinkyone tales. The Journal of American Folklore, 32(124), 346-351. http://www.jstor.org/stable/534986 (Online access available to Sacramento State students, faculty, staff only)

Li, F. K. (1930). Mattole, an Athabaskan language. Chicago: University of Chicago Press. PM 1745 .M3 L5 - 3 North

Nomland, G. A. (1935). Sinkyone notes, University of California Publications in American Archaeology and Ethnology, 36(2), 149-177. Berkeley: University of California Press. E99 .S56 N6 - 2 South

Nomland, G. A. (1938). Bear River ethnography, University of California Anthropological Records, 2(2), 91-126. E78 .C15 N66 - 2 South

Seaburg, W. R. (1977). A Wailaki (Athapaskan) text with comparative notes. International Journal of American Linguistics, 43(4), 327-332. http://www.jstor.org/stable/1264464 (Online access available to Sacramento State students, faculty, staff only)

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Yana

Gifford, E. W., & Klimek, S. (1936). Yana, University of California Publications in American Archaeology and Ethnology, 37(2), 71-100. Berkeley: University of California Press. E99 .Y23 G5 - 2 South

Johnson, J. J. (1978). Yana, In R. F. Heizer (Ed.), Handbook of North American Indians Volume 8 California, (pp.361-369). Washington: Smithsonian Institution. E76.2 .H36 v.8 - 2 North Reference - Library Use Only

Sapir, E. (1917). The position of the Yana in the Hokan stock, University of California Publications in American Archaeology and Ethnology, 13(1). Berkeley: University of California Press. PM4519 .Y4 S25 - 3 North

Sapir, E. (1918). Yana terms of relationship, University of California Publications in American Archaeology and Ethnology, 13(4), 153-173. Berkeley: University of California Press. PM4519 .Y4 S3 - 3 North

Sapir, E. (1922). The fundamental elements of Northern Yana, University of California Publications in American Archaeology and Ethnology, 13(6), 215-234. Berkeley: University of California Press. PH2641 .S4 - 3 North

Sapir, E., & Dixon, R. B. (1910). Yana texts, together with Yana myths, University of California Publications in American Archaeology and Ethnology, 9(1). PM2641 .S3 - 3 North

Sapir, E., & Spier, L. (1943). Notes on the culture of the Yana, University of California Anthropological Records, 3(3), 239-297. E99 Y23 S27 - 2 South

Shackley, S. M. (2000). The stone tool technology of Ishi and the Yana of North Central California: Inferences for hunter-gatherer cultural identity in historic California. American Anthropologist, New Series, 102(4), 693-712. http://www.jstor.org/stable/684194 (Online access available to Sacramento State students, faculty, staff only)

Waterman, T. T. (1918). The Yana Indians, University of California Anthropological Records, 13(2), 35-102. E99 Y23 W3 - 2 South

Wiant, W. C. (1981). Southern Yana subsistence and settlement: An ecological model. Unpublished master's thesis, California State University, Sacramento, Sacramento, California. Thesis W6317 1981 - Lower Level Theses

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Maidu and Konkow

Dixon, R. B. (1900). Basketry designs of the Maidu Indians of California. American Anthropologist, New Series, 2(2), 266-276. http://www.jstor.org/stable/659241 (Online access available to Sacramento State students, faculty, staff only)

Dixon, R. B. (1902). Maidu myths, Bulletin of the American Museum of Natural History, 25(2). 33-118. New York: Knickerbocker Press. E99 .M18 D6 - 2 South

Dixon, R. B. (1905). The Northern Maidu, Bulletin of the American Museum of Natural History, 17(3), 119-346. New York: Knickerbocker Press. E99 .M18 D62 - 2 South

Dixon, R. B. (1912). Maidu texts, Publications of the American Ethnological Society, 4. Leyden, Late E.J. Brill PM1681 .D5 - 3 North

Duncan, J. W. (1964). Maidu ethnobotany. Unpublished master's thesis, California State University, Sacramento, Sacramento, California. Thesis D911 1964 - Lower Level Theses

Fontana, B. L. (1956). Three ethnographic references to the Maidu. Ethnohistory, 3(1), 34-45. http://www.jstor.org/stable/480500 (Online access available to Sacramento State students, faculty, staff only)

Gifford, E. W. (1927). Southern Maidu religious ceremonies. American Anthropologist, New Series, 29(3), 214-257. http://www.jstor.org/stable/661147 (Online access available to Sacramento State students, faculty, staff only)

Hunt, L. A. (1992). Rite of spring: A history of the Mountain Maidu bear dance. Unpublished master's thesis, California State University, Sacramento, Sacramento, California. Thesis H9418 1992 - Lower Level Theses

Hurtado, A. L. (1974). The Maidu and California Indian policy. Unpublished master's thesis, California State University, Sacramento, Sacramento, California. Thesis H9672 1974 - Lower Level Theses

Jewell, D. P. (1987). Indians of the Feather River: Tales and legends of the Concow Maidu of California. Menlo Park, CA: Ballena Press. E99 .M18 J48 1987 - 2 South

Moore, J. (2002). Mountain Maidu acculturation. Unpublished master's thesis, California State University, Sacramento, Sacramento, California. Thesis M82166 2002 - Lower Level Theses

Riddel, F. A. (1978). Maidu and Konkow, In R. F. Heizer (Ed.), Handbook of North American Indians Volume 8 California, (pp.370-386). Washington: Smithsonian Institution. E76.2 .H36 v.8 - 2 North Reference - Library Use Only  

Roberts, H. H. (1980). Concow-Maidu Indians of Round Valley--1925, Association for Northern California Records and Research, 5. D, J. Hill (Ed.). Chico, CA: Association for Northern California Records and Research. E99 .M18 R6 - 2 South

Peterson, R. E. (1977). A case study of a Northern California Indian tribe: Cultural change to 1860. San Francisco: R and E Research Associates. E99 .M18 P47 - 2 South

Potts, M. (1977). The Northern Maidu. Happy Camp, CA: Naturegraph Publishers. E99 .M18 P67 - 2 South

Shipley, W. (1963). Maidu texts and dictionary, University of California Publications in Linguistics, 33. Berkeley: University of California Press. P25 .C25 v.33 - 3 North

Shipley, W. (Ed.). (Trans.). (1991). The Maidu Indian myths and stories of Hánc'ibyjim. Berkeley: Heydey Press. E99 . M18 M34 1991 - 2 South

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Cahto

Goddard, P. E. (1909). Kato texts, University of California Publications in American Archaeology and Ethnology, 5(3), 65-238. Berkeley: University of California Press. PM 1481 .G7 - 3 North

Goddard, P. E. (1912). Elements of the Kato language, University of California Publications in American Archaeology and Ethnology, 11(1). Berkeley: University of California Press. PM 1481 .G65 - 3 North

Myers, J. E. (1978). Cahto, In R. F. Heizer (Ed.), Handbook of North American Indians Volume 8 California, (pp.244-248). Washington: Smithsonian Institution. E76.2 .H36 v.8 - 2 North Reference - Library Use Only

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Yuki, Huchnom, and Coast Yuki

Foster, G. M. (1944). A summary of Yuki culture, University of California Anthropological Records, 5(3), 155-244. Berkeley: University of California Press. E99 .Y92 F6 - 2 South

Gifford, E. W. (1928). The cultural position of the Coast Yuki. American Anthropologist, New Series, 30(1), 112-115. http://www.jstor.org/stable/660967 (Online access available to Sacramento State students, faculty, staff only)

Gifford, E. W. (1937). Coast Yuki myths. The Journal of American Folklore, 50(196), 115-172. http://www.jstor.org/stable/535584 (Online access available to Sacramento State students, faculty, staff only)

Gifford, E. W. (1965). The Coast Yuki, Sacramento Anthropological Society, 2. Sacramento: Sacramento State College. E78 .C15 S3 no. 2 - 2 South

Kelly, I. T. (1930). Yuki Basketry, University of California Publications in American Archaeology and Ethnology, 24(9), 421-443. Berkeley: University of California Press. E99 .Y92 K46 - 2 South

Miller, V. P. (1974). The Yuki: Culture contact to allotment. Ann Arbor, MI: University Microfilms. E99 .Y92 M5 - 2 South

Miller, V. P. (1978). Yuki, Huchnom, and Coast Yuki, In R. F. Heizer (Ed.), Handbook of North American Indians Volume 8 California, (pp.249-255). Washington: Smithsonian Institution. E76.2 .H36 v.8 - 2 North Reference - Library Use Only

Miller, V. P. (1979). Ukomno´m: The Yuki Indians of Northern California, Ballena Press Anthropological Papers, 14. Socorro, NM: Ballena Press. E99 .Y92 M49 - 2 South

Thornton, R. (1986). History, structure, and survival: A comparison of the Yuki (Ukomno'm) and Tolowa (Hush) Indians of Northern California. Ethnology, 25(2), 119-130. http://www.jstor.org/stable/3773664 (Online access available to Sacramento State students, faculty, staff only)

Treganza, A. E. (1950). An archaeological survey of the Yuki area, University of California Anthropological Records, 12(3), 113-124. Berkeley: University of California Press. E99 .Y92 T74 - 2 North Quarto

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Nomlaki

Goldschmidt, W. (1948). Social organization in native California and the origin of clans. American Anthropologist, New Series, 50(3), 444-456. http://www.jstor.org/stable/664293 (Online access available to Sacramento State students, faculty, staff only)

Goldschmidt, W. (1951). Nomlaki ethnography, University of California Publications in American Archaeology and Ethnology, 42(4), 303-443. Berkeley: University of California Press. E99 .N815 G6 - 2 South

Goldschmidt, W. (1978). Nomlaki, In R. F. Heizer (Ed.), Handbook of North American Indians Volume 8 California, (pp.341-349). Washington: Smithsonian Institution. E76.2 .H36 v.8 - 2 North Reference - Library Use Only

Goldschmidt, W., Foster, G, & Essene, F. (1939). War stories from two enemies. The Journal of American Folklore, 52(204), 141-154. http://www.jstor.org/stable/535469 (Online access available to Sacramento State students, faculty, staff only)

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Pomo

Aginsky, B. W., & Aginsky, E. G. (1971). The deep valley: The Pomo Indians of California. New York: Stein and Day. E99 .P65 A33 1971 - 2 South

Barrett, S. A. (1905). Basket designs of the Pomo Indians. American Anthropologist, New Series, 7(4), 648-653. http://www.jstor.org/stable/659110 (Online access available to Sacramento State students, faculty, staff only)

Barrett, S. A. (1906). A composite myth of the Pomo Indians. The Journal of American Folklore, 19(72), 37-51. http://www.jstor.org/stable/534761 (Online access available to Sacramento State students, faculty, staff only)

Barrett, S. A. (1917). Ceremonies of the Pomo Indians, University of California Publications in American Archaeology and Ethnology, 12(10), 397-441. Berkeley: University of California Press. E99 .P65 B23 - 2 South

Barrett, S. A. (1917). Pomo bear doctors, University of California Publications in American Archaeology and Ethnology, 12(11), 443-465. Berkeley: University of California Press. E99 .P65 B24 - 2 South

Barrett, S. A. (1933). Pomo myths, Bulletin of the Public Museum of the city of Milwaukee, 15. Milwaukee, WI. E99 .P65 B25 - 2 South

Barrett, S. A. (1952). Material aspects of Pomo culture, Bulletin of the Public Museum of the city of Milwaukee, 20(1-2). (Vols. 1-2). Milwaukee, WI. E99 .P65 B18 v. 1 and 2 - 2 South

Clark, C., & Williams, T. B. (1954). Pomo Indian myths and some of their sacred meanings. New York: Vantage Press. E99 .P65 C55 - 2 South

Colson, E. (Ed.). (1974). Autobiographies of three Pomo women. Berkeley: Archaeological Research Facility, Dept. of Anthropology, University of California. E99 P65 .C6 - 2 South

Cosso, J. C. (1972). The economic system of the aboriginal Pomo Indians of Northern California. Unpublished master's thesis, California State University, Sacramento, Sacramento, California. Thesis C8367 1972 - Lower Level Theses

Gifford, E. W. (1967). Ethnographic notes on the Southwestern Pomo, University of California Anthropological Records, 25. Berkeley: University of California Press. E99 .P65 G5- 2 South

Gifford, E. W., & Kroeber, A. L. (1937). Pomo, University of California Publications in American Archaeology and Ethnology, 37(4), 117-254. Berkeley: University of California Press. E99 .P65 G45 - 2 South

Halpern, A. M. (1988). Southeastern Pomo ceremonials: The Kuksu Cult and its successors, University of California Anthropological Records, 29. Berkeley: University of California Press. E99 .P65 H34 - 2 South

Heizer, R. F. (Ed.). (1975). Seven early accounts of the Pomo Indians and their culture. Berkeley: Archaeological Research Facility, Dept. of Anthropology, University of California. E99 P65 .S48 - 2 South

Kennedy, M. J. (1955). Culture contact and acculturation of the Southwestern Pomo. Unpublished master’s thesis, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley. E99 .P65 K4 - 2 North Quarto

Kniffen, F. B. (1939). Pomo geography, University of California Publications in American Archaeology and Ethnology, 36(6), 353-399. Berkeley: University of California Press. E99 .P65 K6 - 2 South

Layton, T. N. (1990). Western Pomo prehistory: Excavations at Albion Head, Nightbird's Retreat, and Three Chop Village, Mendocino County, California, Institute of Archaeology, University of California Los Angeles, 32. Los Angeles: Institute of Archaeology, University of California Los Angeles. E99 .P65 L38 1989 - 2 South

Lowell, J. B., & Theodoratus, D. J. (1978). Western Pomo and Northeastern Pomo, In R. F. Heizer (Ed.), Handbook of North American Indians Volume 8 California, (pp.289-305). Washington: Smithsonian Institution. E76.2 .H36 v.8 - 2 North Reference - Library Use Only

McLendon, S., & Lowy, M. J. (1978). Eastern Pomo and Southeastern Pomo, In R. F. Heizer (Ed.), Handbook of North American Indians Volume 8 California, (pp.306-323). Washington: Smithsonian Institution. E76.2 .H36 v.8 - 2 North Reference - Library Use Only

McLendon, S., & Oswalt, R. L. (1978). Pomo: Introduction, In R. F. Heizer (Ed.), Handbook of North American Indians Volume 8 California, (pp.274-288). Washington: Smithsonian Institution. E76.2 .H36 v.8 - 2 North Reference - Library Use Only

Meighan, C. W., & Riddell, F. A. (1972). The Maru cult of the Pomo Indians: A California ghost dance survival, Southwest Museum Papers, 23. Los Angeles: Southwest Museum. E51 .L6 no.23 - 2 South

Sarris, G. (1990). The last woman from Cache Creek: Conversations with Mabel McKay. Ann Arbor, MI: University Microfilms. E99 .P65 S37 1990 - 2 South

Sarris, G. (1993). Keeping slug woman alive: A holistic approach to American Indian texts. Berkeley, University of California Press. E99 .P65 S27 1993. - 2 South

Stewart, O. C. (1943). Notes on Pomo ethnogeography, University of California Publications in American Archaeology and Ethnology, 40(2), 29-62. Berkeley: University of California Press. E99 .P65 S8 - 2 South

Theodoratus, D. J. (1972). Identity crisis: Changes in lifestyle of the Manchester band of Pomo Indians. Unpublished master's thesis, Syracuse University, Syracuse New York. E99 .P65 T5 - 2 South

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Patwin

Heizer, R. F. (1953). The archaeology of the Napa region, University of California Anthropological Records, 12(6). Berkeley: University of California Press. E99 .W35 H4 - 2 North Quarto

Johnson, P. J. (1978). Patwin, In R. F. Heizer (Ed.), Handbook of North American Indians Volume 8 California, (pp.350-360). Washington: Smithsonian Institution. E76.2 .H36 v.8 - 2 North Reference - Library Use Only

Kroeber, A. L. (1932). The Patwin and their neighbors, University of California Publications in American Archaeology and Ethnology, 29(4). 253-423. Berkeley: University of California Press. E99 .P29 K7 - 2 South

McKern, W. C. (1922). Functional families of the Patwin, University of California Publications in American Archaeology and Ethnology, 13(7). 235-258. Berkeley: University of California Press. E99 .P29 M2 - 2 South

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Nisenan

Paul, J. S. (1965). The segmental phonemes of Auburn Nisenan: A dialect of Maidu. Unpublished master's thesis, California State University, Sacramento, Sacramento, California. Thesis P324 1965 - Lower Level Theses

Peterson, R. E. (1977). A case study of a Northern California Indian tribe: Cultural change to 1860. San Francisco: R and E Research Associates. E99 .M18 P47 - 2 South

Shipley, W. (1961). Maidu and Nisenan: A binary survey. International Journal of American Linguistics, 27(1), 46-51. http://www.jstor.org/stable/1264141 (Online access available to Sacramento State students, faculty, staff only)

Uldall, H. J. (1966). Nisenan texts and dictionary, University of California Publications in American Archaeology and Ethnology, 46. Berkeley: University of California Press. P25 .C25 v. 46 - 3 North

Wilson, N. L., & Towne, A. H. (1978). Nisenan, In R. F. Heizer (Ed.), Handbook of North American Indians Volume 8 California, (pp.350-360). Washington: Smithsonian Institution. E76.2 .H36 v.8 - 2 North Reference - Library Use Only

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Wappo

Heizer, R. F. (1953). The archaeology of the Napa region, University of California Anthropological Records, 12(6). Berkeley: University of California Press. E99 .W35 H4 - 2 North Quarto

Kroeber, H. R. (1908). Wappo myths. The Journal of American Folklore, 21(82), 321-323. http://www.jstor.org/stable/534580 (Online access available to Sacramento State students, faculty, staff only)

Li, C. N., Thompson, S. A., & Sawyer, J. O. (1977). Subject and word order in Wappo. International Journal of American Linguistics, 43(2), 85-100. http://www.jstor.org/stable/1264926 (Online access available to Sacramento State students, faculty, staff only)

Radin, P. (1924). Wappo texts, University of California Publications in American Archaeology and Ethnology, 19(1). Berkeley: University of California Press. E99 .W35 R13 - 2 South

Radin, P. (1929). A grammar of the Wappo language, University of California Publications in American Archaeology and Ethnology, 27. Berkeley: University of California Press. PM2547 .R3 - 3 North

Sawyer, J. O. (1978). Wappo, In R. F. Heizer (Ed.), Handbook of North American Indians Volume 8 California, (pp.256-263). Washington: Smithsonian Institution. E76.2 .H36 v.8 - 2 North Reference - Library Use Only

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Coast Miwok,  Lake Miwok, Eastern Miwok

Barrett, S. A., & Gifford, E. W. (1933). Miwok material culture, Bulletin of the Public Museum of the City of Milwaukee, 2(4), 119-376. Milwaukee, WI: Published by order of the Board of Trustees. E 99 .M69 B24 - 2 South  

Barrett, S. A., & Kroeber, A. L. (1908). The geography and dialects of the Miwok Indians and On the evidences of certain regions by the Miwok Indians, University of California Publications in American Archaeology and Ethnology, 6(2-3), 333-368.  Berkeley: University of California Press.  E99 .M69 B2 - 2 South  

Beckwith, B. R. (1995) An evaluation of the cultural significance of plants used by the Coast Miwok of Marin and Southern Sonoma Counties with emphasis on Olompoli State Historical Park. Unpublished master's thesis, California State University, Sacramento, Sacramento, California. Thesis B39782 1995 - Lower Level Theses

Bennyhoff , J. A. (1961). Ethnogeography of the Plains Miwok, Center for Archaeological Research at Davis, 5. Davis, CA: Center for Archaeological Research. E 99 .M69 B44 - 2 South    

Callaghan, C. A. (1965). Lake Miwok dictionary, University of California Publications in Linguistics, 39. Berkeley: University of California Press. P25 .C25 v.39 - 3 North

Callaghan, C. A. (1978). Lake Miwok, In R. F. Heizer (Ed.), Handbook of North American Indians Volume 8 California, (pp.264-273). Washington: Smithsonian Institution. E76.2 .H36 v.8 - 2 North Reference - Library Use Only

Conrotto, E. L. (1973). Miwok means people; the life and fate of the native inhabitants of the California gold rush country. Fresno, CA: Valley Publishers. E99 .M69 C66 - 2 South

Gifford, E. W. (1916). Miwok moieties, University of California publications in American archaeology and ethnology, 12(4), 139-194. Berkeley: University of California Press. E99 .M69 G45 - 2 South

Godfrey, E. (1973). Yosemite Indians. Yosemite Natural History Association. E78 .C15 G6 1973 - 2 South

Kelly, I. (1978). Coast Miwok, In R. F. Heizer (Ed.), Handbook of North American Indians Volume 8 California, (pp.414-425). Washington: Smithsonian Institution. E76.2 .H36 v.8 - 2 North Reference - Library Use Only

Levy. R. (1978). Eastern Miwok, In R. F. Heizer (Ed.), Handbook of North American Indians Volume 8 California, (pp.398-413). Washington: Smithsonian Institution. E76.2 .H36 v.8 - 2 North Reference - Library Use Only

Maniery, J. G. (1982). Ethnohistory and archaeology: a comparative study of two historic Central Sierra Miwok villages. Unpublished master’s thesis, California State University Sacramento. Thesis M27765 1982 - Lower Level Theses

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Costanoan

Bacon, B. (1991). People at the edge of the world: The Ohlone of central California. Berkeley: B.M. Bacon. E99 .C8744 B33 1991 - 2 South

Bean, L. J. (Ed.). (1994). The Ohlone past and present: Native Americans of the San Francisco Bay Area. Menlo Park, CA: Ballena Press Anthropological Papers, 42. E99 .C8744 O45 1994 - 2 South

Beeler, M. S. (1961). Northern Costanoan. International Journal of American Linguistics, 27(3),191-197. http://www.jstor.org/stable/1264228 (Online access available to Sacramento State students, faculty, staff only)

Beeler, M. S. (1972). An Extension of San Francisco Bay Costanoan? International Journal of American Linguistics, 38(1), 49-54. http://www.jstor.org/stable/1264500 (Online access available to Sacramento State students, faculty, staff only)

Brown, A. K. (1973). San Francisco Bay Costanoan. International Journal of American Linguistics, 39(3), 184-189. http://www.jstor.org/stable/1264570 (Online access available to Sacramento State students, faculty, staff only)

Callaghan, C. A. (1967). Miwok-Costanoan as a subfamily of Penutian. International Journal of American Linguistics, 33(3), 224-227. http://www.jstor.org/stable/1264214 (Online access available to Sacramento State students, faculty, staff only)

Field, L. W. (2003). Unacknowledged tribes, dangerous knowledge: The Muwekma Ohlone and how Indian identites are ‘known’. Wicazo Sa Review, 18(2), 79-94. http://www.jstor.org/stable/1409538 (Online access available to Sacramento State students, faculty, staff only)

Field, L. W., & Leventhal, A. (2003). “What it must have been like!” critical considerations of precontact Ohlone cosmology as interpreted through Central California ethnohistory. Wicazo Sa Review, 18(2), 95-126. http://www.jstor.org/stable/1409539 (Online access available to Sacramento State students, faculty, staff only)

Heizer, R. F. (Ed.). (1974). The Costanoan Indians : An assemblage of papers on the language and culture of the Costanoan Indians who in aboriginal times occupied San Francisco, San Mateo, Santa Clara, Alameda and parts of Contra Costa, Monterey and San Benito Counties, Local History Studies, 18. Cupertino, CA: California History Center, De Anza College. E99 .C8746 H4 - 2 South

Kroeber, A. L. (1910). The Chumash and Costanoan language, University of California Publications in American Archaeology and Ethnology, 9(2). Berkeley: University of California Press. PM891 .K7 - 3 North

Laverty, P. (2003). The Ohlone/Costanoan-Esselen Nation of Monterey, California: Dispossession, Federal neglect, and the bitter irony of the Federal acknowledgment process. Wicazo Sa Review, 18(2), 41-77. http://www.jstor.org/stable/1409537 (Online access available to Sacramento State students, faculty, staff only)

Levy, R. (1978). Costanoan, In R. F. Heizer (Ed.), Handbook of North American Indians Volume 8 California, (pp.485-495). Washington: Smithsonian Institution. E76.2 .H36 v.8 - 2 North Reference - Library Use Only

Margolin, M. (1978). The Ohlone Way: Indian life in the San Francisco-Monterey Bay area. Berkeley: Heyday Books. E99 .C8744 M37 1978 - 2 South

Skoronek, R. K. (1998). Sifting the evidence: Perceptions of life at the Ohlone (Costanoan) missions of Alta California. Ethnohistory, 45(4), 675-708. http://www.jstor.org/stable/483300 (Online access available to Sacramento State students, faculty, staff only)

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Northern Valley Yokuts, Foothill Yokuts, Southern Valley Yokuts, Monache

Arkush, B. S. (1993). Yokuts trade networks and native culture change in Central and Eastern California. Ethnohistory, 40(4), 619-640. http://www.jstor.org/stable/482590 (Online access available to Sacramento State students, faculty, staff only)

Callaghan, C. A. (1997). Evidence for Yok-Utian. International Journal of American Linguistics, 63(1), 18-64. http://www.jstor.org/stable/1265864 (Online access available to Sacramento State students, faculty, staff only)

Callaghan, C. A. (2001). More evidence for Yok-Utian: A reanalysis of the Dixon and Kroeber sets. International Journal of American Linguistics, 67(3), 313-345. http://www.jstor.org/stable/1265989 (Online access available to Sacramento State students, faculty, staff only)

Dick-Bissonnette, L. E. (1998). Gender and authority among the Yokoch, Mono, and Miwok of Central California. Journal of Anthropological Research, 54(1), 49-72. http://www.jstor.org/stable/3631676 (Online access available to Sacramento State students, faculty, staff only)

Gayton, A. H. (1929). Yokuts and Western Mono pottery-making, University of California Publications in American Archaeology and Ethnology, 24(3), 239-251. Berkeley: University of California Press. E98 .P8 G28 - 2 South

Gayton, A. H. (1930). Yokuts-Mono chiefs and shamans, University of California Publications in American Archaeology and Ethnology, 24(8), 361-420. Berkeley: University of California Press. E99 .Y75 G29 - 2 South

Gayton, A. H. (1945). Yokuts and Western Mono social organization. American Anthropologist, New Series, 47(3), 409-426. http://www.jstor.org/stable/662760 (Online access available to Sacramento State students, faculty, staff only)

Gayton, A. H. (1946). Culture-environment integration: External references in Yokuts life. Southwestern Journal of Anthropology, 2(3), 252-268. http://www.jstor.org/stable/3628717 (Online access available to Sacramento State students, faculty, staff only)

Gayton, A. H. (1948). Yokuts and Western Mono ethnography, University of California Anthropological Records, 10(1-2). (2 Vols.). Berkeley: University of California Press. E99 .Y75 G292 v. 1 & 2 - 2 South

Gayton, A. H., & Newman, S. S. (1940). Yokuts and Western Mono myths, University of California Anthropological Records, 5(1). Berkeley: University of California Press. E98 .F6 G39 - 2 South

Gifford, E. W. (1932). The Northfork Mono, University of California Publications in American Archaeology and Ethnology, 31(2), 15-65. Berkeley: University of California Press. E99 .M86 G5 - 2 South

Gifford, E. W. (1923). Western Mono myths. The Journal of American Folklore, 36(142), 301-367. http://www.jstor.org/stable/535047 (Online access available to Sacramento State students, faculty, staff only)

Gray, T. B. (1993). The Stanislaus Indian wars: The last of the California Northern Yokuts. Modesto, Calif: McHenry Museum Press. E99 .Y75 G73 1993 - 2 South

Kroeber, A. L. (1906). The Yokuts and Yuki langugage. New York. PM2681 .K74 - Special Collections & University Archives - Library Use Only

Kroeber, A. L. (1907). The Yokuts language of South Central California, University of California Publications in American Archaeology and Ethnology, 2(5), 165-393. Berkeley: University of California Press. PM2681 .K73 - 3 North

Kroeber, A. L. (1963). Yokuts dialect survey, University of California Anthropological Records, 11(3), 177-251. Berkeley: University of California Press. PM2681 .K7 - 3 North

Latta, F. F. (1949). Handbook of Yokuts Indians. Oildale, CA: Bear State Books. E99 .Y75 L3 - 2 South

Lee, G. D. (1998). Walking where we lived: Memoirs of a Mono Indian family. Norman: University of Oklahoma Press. E99 .M86 L44 1998 – 2 South

Mayfield, T. J. ( 1993). Indian summer: Traditional life among the Choinumne Indians of California's San Joaquin Valley. Berkeley: Heyday Books and California Historical Society. F868 .S173 M458 1993 - 2 South

Newman, S. S. (1944). Yokuts langague of California, Viking Fund Publications in Anthropology, 2. New York. PM2681 .N4 - 3 North

Pietroforte, A. (1965). Songs of the Yokuts and Paiutes. (V. Brown Ed.). Healdsburg, CA: Naturgraph Publishers. ML3557 .P53 - 3 North

Pilling, A. R. (1950). The archeological implications of an annual coastal visit for certain Yokuts groups. American Anthropologist, New Series, 52(3), 438-440. http://www.jstor.org/stable/664529 (Online access available to Sacramento State students, faculty, staff only)

Silverstein, M. (1978). Yokuts: Introduction, In R. F. Heizer (Ed.), Handbook of North American Indians Volume 8 California, (pp.446-447). Washington: Smithsonian Institution. E76.2 .H36 v.8 - 2 North Reference - Library Use Only

Spier, R. F. G. (1978). Foothill Yokuts, In R. F. Heizer (Ed.), Handbook of North American Indians Volume 8 California, (pp.471-484). Washington: Smithsonian Institution. E76.2 .H36 v.8 - 2 North Reference - Library Use Only

Spier, M. (1978). Monache, In R. F. Heizer (Ed.), Handbook of North American Indians Volume 8 California, (pp.426-436). Washington: Smithsonian Institution. E76.2 .H36 v.8 - 2 North Reference - Library Use Only

Vittitow, L. (1999). Analysis of the lithic assemblage from the Five Mile Slough Site (CA-SJO-105): implications for Yokuts economic behavior. Unpublished master's thesis, California State University, Sacramento, Sacramento, California. Thesis V8445 1999 - Lower Level Theses

Wallace, W. J. (1978). Northern Valley Yokuts, In R. F. Heizer (Ed.), Handbook of North American Indians Volume 8 California, (pp.462-470). Washington: Smithsonian Institution. E76.2 .H36 v.8 - 2 North Reference - Library Use Only

Wallace, W. J. (1978). Southern Valley Yokuts, In R. F. Heizer (Ed.), Handbook of North American Indians Volume 8 California, (pp.448-461). Washington: Smithsonian Institution. E76.2 .H36 v.8 - 2 North Reference - Library Use Only

Whistler, K.W., & Golla, V. (1986). Proto-Yokuts reconsidered. International Journal of American Linguistics, 52(4), 317-358. http://www.jstor.org/stable/1265536 (Online access available to Sacramento State students, faculty, staff only)

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Esselen

Hester, T. R. (1978). Esselen, In R. F. Heizer (Ed.), Handbook of North American Indians Volume 8 California, (pp.496-499). Washington: Smithsonian Institution. E76.2 .H36 v.8 - 2 North Reference - Library Use Only

Pinart, A. L. (1952). The mission Indian vocabularies of Alphonse Pinart, University of California Anthropological Records, 15(1). R. F. Heizer (Ed.). Berkeley: University of California Press. PM 971 .P6 - 2 North Quarto

Shaul, D. L. (1995). The Huelel (Esselen) language. International Journal of American Linguistics, 61(2), 191-239. http://www.jstor.org/stable/1265728 (Online access available to Sacramento State students, faculty, staff only)

Shaul, D. L. (1995). The last words of Esselen. International Journal of American Linguistics, 61(2), 245-249. http://www.jstor.org/stable/1265730 (Online access available to Sacramento State students, faculty, staff only)

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Salinan

Baldwin, M. A. (1969). Archaeological evidence of cultural continuity from Chumash to Salinan Indians in California, Occasional Paper, San Luis Obispo County Archaeological Society, 6. San Luis Obispo, CA: San Luis Obispo County Archaeological Society. E78 .C15 B18 - 2 South

Hester, T. R. (1978). Salinan, In R. F. Heizer (Ed.), Handbook of North American Indians Volume 8 California, (pp.500-504). Washington: Smithsonian Institution.E76.2 .H36 v.8 - 2 North Reference - Library Use Only

Hoover, R. L. (1977). Ethnohistoric Salinan acculturation. Ethnohistory, 24(3), 261-268. http://www.jstor.org/stable/481699 (Online access available to Sacramento State students, faculty, staff only)

Mason, J. A. (1912). The ethnology of the Salinan Indians, University of California Publications in American Archaeology and Ethnography, 10(4), 97-240. Berkeley: University of California Press. E99 .S17 M3 - 2 South

Mason, J. A. (1918). The language of the Salinan Indians, University of California Publications in American Archaeology and Ethnography, 14(1). Berkeley: University of California Press. PM2251 .M3 - 3 North

Sapir, E. (1921). A supplementary note on Salinan and Washo. International Journal of American Linguistics, 2(1/2), 68-72. http://www.jstor.org/stable/1263182 (Online access available to Sacramento State students, faculty, staff only)

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Tübatulabal

Gifford, E. W. (1917). Tübatulabal and Kawaiisu kinship terms, University of California Publications in American Archaeology and Ethnology, 12(6), 219-248. Berkeley: University of California Press. PM 2495 .T7 G5 1935 - 3 North

Powers, B. (1981). Indian country of the Tubatulabal. Tucson, AZ: Westernlore Press. E 99 .T83 P68 - 2 North Quarto

Smith, C. R. (1978). Tubatulabal, In R. F. Heizer (Ed.), Handbook of North American Indians Volume 8 California, (pp.437-445). Washington: Smithsonian Institution. E76.2 .H36 v.8 - 2 North Reference - Library Use Only

Voegelin, C. F. (1935). Tübatulabal grammar, University of California Publications in American Archaeology and Ethnology, 34(2), 55-189. Berkeley: University of California Press. PM 2495 .T7 V6 - 3 North

Voegelin, C. F. (1935). Tübatulabal texts, University of California Publications in American Archaeology and Ethnology, 34(3), 191-246. Berkeley: University of California Press. PM 2495 .T7 Z73 1935 - 3 North

Voegelin, C. F. (1948). Initial and Final Elements in Tübatulabal Myths. Southwestern Journal of Anthropology, 4(1), 71-75. http://www.jstor.org/stable/3628473 (Online access available to Sacramento State students, faculty, staff only)

Voegelin, C. F. (1958). Working Dictionary of Tubatulabal. International Journal of American Linguistics, 24(3), 221-228. http://www.jstor.org/stable/1263500 (Online access available to Sacramento State students, faculty, staff only)

Whorf, B. L. (1936). Notes on the Tübatulabal Language. American Anthropologist, New Series, 38(2), 341-344. http://www.jstor.org/stable/662353 (Online access available to Sacramento State students, faculty, staff only)

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Chumash: Eastern Coastal Chumash, Obispeño and Purisimeño Chumash, Island Chumash, Interior Chumash

Arnold, J. E. (1992). Complex hunter-gatherer-fishers of prehistoric California: Chiefs, specialists, and maritime adaptations of the Channel Islands. American Antiquity, 57(1), 60-84. http://www.jstor.org/stable/2694835 (Online access available to Sacramento State students, faculty, staff only)

Arnold, J. E. (Ed.). (2001). The origins of a Pacific Coast chiefdom: the Chumash of the Channel Islands. Salt Lake City: University of Utah Press. E99 .C815 O75 2001 - 2 South 

Arnold, J. E., & Green, T. M. (2002). Mortuary ambiguity: The Ventureño Chumash cave. American Antiquity, 67(4), 760-771. http://www.jstor.org/stable/1593803 (Online access available to Sacramento State students, faculty, staff only)

Beers, C. D. et al. (1975). Papers on the Chumash, Occasional Paper, San Luis Obispo County Archaeological Society, 9. San Luis Obispo, CA: San Luis Obispo County Archaeological Society. E99 .C815 P3 - 2 South

Campbell, G. (1978). Chumash: Introduction, In R. F. Heizer (Ed.), Handbook of North American Indians Volume 8 California, (pp.505-508). Washington: Smithsonian Institution. E76.2 .H36 v.8 - 2 North Reference - Library Use Only

Campbell, G. (1978). Eastern Coastal Chumash, In R. F. Heizer (Ed.), Handbook of North American Indians Volume 8 California, (pp.509-519). Washington: Smithsonian Institution. E76.2 .H36 v.8 - 2 North Reference - Library Use Only

Campbell, G. (1978). Interior Chumash, In R. F. Heizer (Ed.), Handbook of North American Indians Volume 8 California, (pp.530-534). Washington: Smithsonian Institution. E76.2 .H36 v.8 - 2 North Reference - Library Use Only

Campbell, G. (1978). Island Chumash, In R. F. Heizer (Ed.), Handbook of North American Indians Volume 8 California, (pp.524-529). Washington: Smithsonian Institution. E76.2 .H36 v.8 - 2 North Reference - Library Use Only

Gamble, L. H., Walker, P. L., & Russell, G. S. (2001). An integrative approach to mortuary analysis: Social and symbolic dimensions of Chumash burial practices. American Antiquity, 66(2), 185-212. http://www.jstor.org/stable/2694605 (Online access available to Sacramento State students, faculty, staff only)

Gamble, L. H., Walker, P. L., & Russell, G. S. (2002). Further considerations on the emergence of Chumash chiefdoms. American Antiquity, 67(4), 772-777. http://www.jstor.org/stable/1593804 (Online access available to Sacramento State students, faculty, staff only)

Greenwood, R. S. (1978). Obispeño and Purisimeño Chumash, In R. F. Heizer (Ed.), Handbook of North American Indians Volume 8 California, (pp.524-529). Washington: Smithsonian Institution. E76.2 .H36 v.8 - 2 North Reference - Library Use Only

Holmes, M. S., & Johnson, J. R. (1998). The Chumash and their predecessors: An annotated bibliography. Santa Barbara Museum of Natural History Contributions in Anthropology. Santa Barbara, CA.: Santa Barbara Museum of Natural History. E99 .C815 H6 1998 - 2 South

Hudson, T. (Ed.).  (1981). The eye of the flute: Chumash traditional history and ritual as told by Fernando Librado Kitsepawit to John P. Harrington, Santa Barbara Bicentennial  Historical Series, 4. Banning, CA: Malki Museum Press ; Santa Barbara, Calif.: Santa Barbara Museum of Natural History. E 99 .C815 L52 1981 - 2 South

Hudson, T., & Blackburn, T. C. (1982). The material culture of the Chumash interaction sphere, Ballena Press Anthropological Papers, 25. Los Altos, CA: Ballena Press; Santa Barbara, Calif.: Santa Barbara Museum of Natural History. E 99 .C815 H83 1982  v.1 - 2 South

Johnson, J. R. (2007). Ethnohistoric descriptions of Chumash warfare. In R. J. Chacon, & R. G. Mendoza (Eds.), North American indigenous warfare and ritual violence. (pp. 74-113). Tucson: University of Arizona Press. E 98 .W2 N67 2007 - 1 North Browsing

King, C. (1990). Evolution of Chumash society: A comparative study of artifacts used for social system maintenance in the Santa Barbara Channel Region before A. D. 1804. New York: Garland Pub. E99 .C815 K55 1990 - 2 South

Kroeber, A. L. (1910). The Chumash and Costanoan languages, University of California Publications in American Archaeology and Ethnology, 9(2), 237-271. Berkeley: University of California Press. PM891 .K7 - 3 North

Landberg, L. C. W. (1965). The Chumash Indians of Southern California, Southwest Museum Papers, 19. Los Angeles: Southwest Museum. E51 .L6 no. 19 - 2 South

Larson, D. O., Johnson, J. R., & Michaelsen, J. C. (1994). Missionization among the Coastal Chumash of Central California: A study of risk minimization strategies. American Anthropologist, New Series, 96(2), 263-299. http://www.jstor.org/stable/681675 (Online access available to Sacramento State students, faculty, staff only)

Nabokov, P. (1989). Reconstituting the Chumash: A review essay. American Indian Quarterly, 13(4), 535-543. http://www.jstor.org/stable/1184534 (Online access available to Sacramento State students, faculty, staff only)

Olson, R. L. (1930). Chumash prehistory, University of California Publications in American Archaeology and Ethnology, 28(1). Berkeley: University of California Press. E99 .C815 O52 - 2 South

Miller, B. W. (1988). Chumash: A picture of their world. Los Osos, CA: Sand River Press. E 99 .C815 M55 1988 - 2 South

Sandos, J. A. (1991). Christianization among the Chumash: An ethnohistoric perspective. American Indian Quarterly, 15(1), 65-89. http://www.jstor.org/stable/1185216 (Online access available to Sacramento State students, faculty, staff only)

Timbrook, J. (2007). Chumash ethnobotany: Plant knowledge among the Chumash people of Southern California. Santa Barbara, CA: Santa Barbara Museum of Natural History; Berkeley, CA: Heyday Books. E99 .C815 T56 2007 - 2 South

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Kitanemuk

Blackburn, T. C., & Bean, L. J. (1978). Kitanemuk, In R. F. Heizer (Ed.), Handbook of North American Indians Volume 8 California, (pp.564-569). Washington: Smithsonian Institution. E76.2 .H36 v.8 - 2 North Reference - Library Use Only

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Tataviam

King, C., & Blackburn, T. C. (1978). Tataviam, In R. F. Heizer (Ed.), Handbook of North American Indians Volume 8 California, (pp.535-537). Washington: Smithsonian Institution. E76.2 .H36 v.8 - 2 North Reference - Library Use Only

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Serrano

Bean, L. J., & Smith, C. R. (1978). Serrano, In R. F. Heizer (Ed.), Handbook of North American Indians Volume 8 California, (pp.570-574). Washington: Smithsonian Institution. E76.2 .H36 v.8 - 2 North Reference - Library Use Only

Benedict, R. F. (1924). A Brief Sketch of Serrano Culture. American Anthropologist, New Series, 26(3), 366-392. http://www.jstor.org/stable/661483 (Online access available to Sacramento State students, faculty, staff only)

Benedict, R. F. (1926). Serrano Tales. The Journal of American Folklore, 39(151), 1-17. http://www.jstor.org/stable/534967 (Online access available to Sacramento State students, faculty, staff only)

Strong, W. D. (1929). Aboriginal society in Southern California, University of California Publications in American Archaeology and Ethnology, 26. Berkeley: University of California Press. E99 .C15 S87- 2 South

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Gabrieliño

Bean, L. J., & Smith, C. R. (1978). Gabrielino, In R. F. Heizer (Ed.), Handbook of North American Indians Volume 8 California, (pp.538-549). Washington: Smithsonian Institution. E76.2 .H36 v.8 - 2 North Reference - Library Use Only

Johnston, B. (1962). California’s Gabrieliño Indians, Frederick Webb Hodge Anniversary Publication Fund. 8. Los Angeles: Southwest Museum. E 99 .G15 J6 - 2 South

McCawley. W. (1996). The first Angelinos: The Gabrieliño Indians of Los Angeles. Banning, CA: Malki Museum Press; Novato, CA: Ballena Press. E 99 .G15 M34 1996 - 2 South

Miller, B. W. (1991). The Gabrieliño. Los Osos, CA: Sand River Press. E 99 .G15 M54 1991 - 2 South

Reid, H. (1926). The Indians of Los Angeles County. Los Angeles, Priv. Print. E 99 .G15 R32 – Special Collections & University Archives - Library Use Only

Wheeler, T. L. (2004). Late period Gabrielino mortuary practices, resource control, and shifts in the focus of resource intensification. Unpublished master's thesis, California State University, Sacramento, Sacramento, California. Thesis W56393 2004 - Lower Level Theses

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Luiseño

Bean, L. J., & Shipek, F. C. (1978). Luiseño, In In R. F. Heizer (Ed.), Handbook of North American Indians Volume 8 California, (pp.550-563). Washington: Smithsonian Institution. E76.2 .H36 v.8 - 2 North Reference - Library Use Only

Davis, E. H. (1921). Early cremation ceremonies of the Luiseño and Diegueño Indians of Southern California, Indian Notes and Monographs, 7(3), 91-100. New York: Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation, 1921. E98 .M8 D3 - 2 South

Du Bois, C. G., & Kroeber, A. L. (1908). The religion of the Luiseño Indians of Southern California, University of California Publications in American Archaeology and Ethnology, 8(3), 69-183. Berkeley: University of California Press. E 99 .L9 D8 - 2 South

Hyde, V. (1971). An introduction to the Luiseño language. Banning, CA : Malki Museum Press. PM 1651 .H9 - 3 North

Kroeber, A. L., & Grace, G. W. (1960). The Sparkman grammar of Luiseno, University of California Publications in Linguistics, 16. Berkeley: University of California Press. P 25 .C25 v.16 – 3 North

McCown, B. E. (1955).  Temeku: A page from the history of the Luiseño IndiansArchaeological Survey Association of Southern California. Paper, 3. Los Angeles: Archaeological Survey Association of Southern California. F 867 .A73 no. 3 - 2 South

Shipek, F. C. (1980). A strategy for change: The Luiseño of Southern California. Ann Arbor, MI: University Microfilms International. E 99 .L9 S5 1980 - 2 South

Sparkman, P. S. (1908). The culture of the Luiseño Indians, University of California publications in American archaeology and ethnology, 8(4), 187-237. Berkeley: University of California Press. E 99 .L9 S7 - 2 South

White, R. C. (1953). Two surviving Luiseño Indian ceremonies. American Anthropologist, New Series, 55(4), 569-578. http://www.jstor.org/stable/663785 (Online access available to Sacramento State students, faculty, staff only)

White, R. C. (1957).  The Luiseño theory of "knowledge". American Anthropologist, New Series, 59(1). 1-19. http://www.jstor.org/stable/666526 (Online access available to Sacramento State students, faculty, staff only)

White, R. C. (1963). Luiseño social organization, University of California Publications in American Archaeology and Ethnology, 48(2), 91-194. Berkeley: University of California Press. E 99 .L9 W5 1963 - 2 South

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Cahuilla

Bean, L. J. (1972). Mukat's people; the Cahuilla Indians of Southern California. Berkeley: University of California Press. E 99 .C155 B4 - 2 South

Bean, L. J. (1978). Cahuilla, , In R. F. Heizer (Ed.), Handbook of North American Indians Volume 8 California, (pp.575-587). Washington: Smithsonian Institution. E76.2 .H36 v.8 - 2 North Reference - Library Use Only

Bean, L. J., & Lawton, H. W. (1967). A bibliography of the Cahuilla Indians of California. Banning, CA: Malki Museum Press, Morongo Reservation. EZ 1210 .C3 B4 - 2 North Reference - Library Use Only

Bean, L. J., & Saubel, K. S. (1972). Temalpakh (from the earth): Cahuilla Indian knowledge and usage of plants. Banning, CA: Malki Museum Press. E99 .C155 B42 - 2 South

Brumgardt, J. R., & Bowles, L. L. (1981). People of the magic waters: the Cahuilla Indians of Palm Springs. Palm Springs, CA: ETC Publications. E99 .C155 B77 - 2 South

Hooper, L. (1920). The Cahuilla Indians, University of California Publications in American Archaeology and Ethnology, 16(6), 315-380. E99 .C155 H7 - 2 South

James, H. C. (1969). The Cahuilla Indians. Morongo Indian Reservation, CA: Maliki Museum Press. E 99 .K27 J3 1969 - 2 South

Lane, A. I. (1995). Return of the buffalo: The story behind America's Indian gaming explosion. Westport, Conn.: Bergin & Garvey. E99 .C155 L35 1995 - 2

Romero, B. (1992). World view of Tewa and Cahuilla encourage adaptation to place and resounds in song. Wicazo Sa Review, 8(1), 65-69. http://www.jstor.org/stable/1409364 (Online access available to Sacramento State students, faculty, staff only)

Seiler, H. (1982). Inherent versus established relation, proximity versus obviation, and two types of Cahuilla kinship expressions. International Journal of American Linguistics, 48(2), 185-196. http://www.jstor.org/stable/1264680 (Online access available to Sacramento State students, faculty, staff only)

Wilke, P. J. (1975). The Cahuilla Indians of the Colorado desert: Ethnohistory and prehistory, Ballena Press Anthropological Papers, 3. Ramona, CA: Ballena Press. E 99 .C155 C34 - 2 South

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Cupeño

Bahr, D. M. (1993). From mission to metropolis: Cupeneo Indian women in Los Angeles. Norman:
University of Oklahoma Press. E 99 .C94 B35 1993 - 2 South

Bean, L. J., & Smith, C. R. (1978). Cupeño, In R. F. Heizer (Ed.), Handbook of North American Indians Volume 8 California, (pp.592-609). Washington: Smithsonian Institution. E76.2 .H36 v.8 - 2 North Reference - Library Use Only

Faye, P. L. (1928). Christmas Fiestas of the Cupeño. American Anthropologist, New Series, 30(4), 651-658. http://www.jstor.org/stable/661121 (Online access available to Sacramento State students, faculty, staff only)

Hill, J. H. (1972). Cupeno Lexicalization and Language History. International Journal of American Linguistics, 38(3), 161-172. http://www.jstor.org/stable/1264907 (Online access available to Sacramento State students, faculty, staff only)

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Tipai and Ipai
   
Almstedt, R. F. (1968). Diegueno "tree": An ecological approach to a linguistic problem. International Journal of American Linguistics, 34(1), 9-15. http://www.jstor.org/stable/1263706 (Online access available to Sacramento State students, faculty, staff only)

Almstedt, R. F. (1974). Bibliography of the Diegueño Indians. Ramona, CA: Ballena Press. EZ 1210 .D53 A37 - 2 North Reference - Library Use Only

Davis, E. H. (1921). Early cremation ceremonies of the Luiseño and Diegueño Indians of Southern California, Indian Notes and Monographs, 7(3), 91-110. New York, Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation. E 98 .M8 D3 - 2 South

Du Bois, C. G. (1905). The mythology of the Diegueños, mission Indians of San Diego county, California, as proving their status to be higher than is generally believed, Transactions of the International Congress of Americanists, 101-106. Easton, PA: : Eschenbach Printing Co. E 99 .D5 D8 - 2 South

Du Bois, C. G. (1907). Diegueño mortuary ollas. American Anthropologist, New Series, 9(3), 484-486. http://www.jstor.org/stable/659532 (Online access available to Sacramento State students, faculty, staff only)

Du Bois, C. G. (1908). Ceremonies and traditions of the Diegueno Indians. The Journal of American Folklore, 21(81), 228-236. http://www.jstor.org/stable/534639 (Online access available to Sacramento State students, faculty, staff only)

Hayes, A. S. (1954). Field procedures while working with Diegueño. International Journal of American Linguistics, 20(3)185-194. http://www.jstor.org/stable/1263342 (Online access available to Sacramento State students, faculty, staff only)
           
Hedges, K., & Beresford, C. (1986). Santa Ysabel ethnobotanyEthnic Technology Notes, 20. San Diego, CA: San Diego Museum of Man. E 99 .D5 H4 - 2 South

Kroeber, A. L., & Harrington, J. P. (1914). Phonetic elements of the Diegueño language, University of California Publications in American Archaeology and Ethnology, 11(2), 177-188. Berkeley: University of California Press. PM 1071 .K7- 3 North

Luomala, K. (1978). Tipai-Ipai, In R. F. Heizer (Ed.), Handbook of North American Indians Volume 8 California, (pp.592-609). Washington: Smithsonian Institution. E76.2 .H36 v.8 - 2 North Reference - Library Use Only

Mixco, M. J. (1978). Cochimi and proto-Yuman: Lexical and syntactic evidence for a new language family in Lower California, University of Utah Anthropological Papers, 101. Salt Lake City: University of Utah Press. E 51 .U8 no.101 - 2 South

Treganza, A. E. (1947). Possibilities of an Aboriginal Practice of Agriculture among the Southern Diegueno. American Antiquity, 12(3), 169-173. http://www.jstor.org/stable/275704 (Online access available to Sacramento State students, faculty, staff only)

Waterman, T. T. (1910). The religious practices of the Diegueño Indians, University of California Publications in American Archaeology and Ethnology, 8(6), 271-358. Berkeley: University of California Press. E 99 .D5 W3 - 2 South

Woodward, J. A. (1968). The anniversary: A contemporary Diegueno complex. Ethnology, 7(1), 86-94. http://www.jstor.org/stable/3772811 (Online access available to Sacramento State students, faculty, staff only)

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Selected Internet Sources On Native Americans and California Native Americans

California Digital Library, Online Archive of California, C. Hart Merriam Collection of Native American Photographs, ca. 1890-1938: http://www.oac.cdlib.org/findaid/ark:/13030/tf9f59p6w7

California Native American Heritage Commission:
http://www.nahc.ca.gov/default.html

California State University, Sacramento, Anthropology Resource Guide: http://library.csus.edu/services/inst/AnthResourceGuide.html

Librarians' Internet Index, California's Native Americans: http://lii.org/pub/subtopic/3482

Mitten, L. (1995-2008). Native American nations: Information on individual Native Nations: http://www.nativeculturelinks.com/nations.html

Portland State University, Selected Resources on Columbia Basin Native Americans: http://www.lib.pdx.edu/instruction/basinmap.html

United States Department of the Interior, Bureau of Indian Affairs Homepage:
http://www.doi.gov/bia/

University of California, Berkeley, California Indian Library Collections Bibliographies of Northern and Central California Indians:
lhttp://www.mip.berkeley.edu/cilc/bibs/toc.htm

University of California, Santa Barbara, Voice of the Shuttle California Indian Tribes: http://vos.ucsb.edu/browse.asp?id=4178



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Last updated: 10/19/2009